The panel discussion “An Unbridgeable Divide? How to Heal the EU’s East-West Fracture”

The panel discussion “An Unbridgeable Divide? How to Heal the EU’s East-West Fracture”

On January 21st, 2020, the Casimir Pulaski Foundation hosted an expert debate co-organized with our partner – Carnegie Europe – entitled “An Unbridgeable Divide? How to Heal the EU’s East-West Fracture”. The discussion focused on the nature of the East-West tensions and possible solutions.

Carnegie Europe fellows Tomáš ValášekPierre Vimont, and Stefan Lehne led the discussion, which also featured experts Jan Macháček, chairman of the Board of Trustees at the Institute for Politics and Society in Prague; Katarzyna Pisarska, program director of the Warsaw Security Forum; and Márton Ugrósdy, director of the Institute for Foreign Affairs and Trade (IFAT) in Budapest. The debate was kicked off with a brief presentation of a series of action points conceived to bridge the East-West gap and to take the sting out of disagreements – as outlined in Carnegie Europe’s recent publication entitled “Why Can’t the EU’s West and East Work as One?”. It also reflected on the proposed solutions and share alternate insights on how the relationship could be strengthened. The event was concluded with a lively discussion with an enthusiastic audience of over 40 experts and diplomats from 10 countries and a networking session. 

The event was a part of the “Bridging the EU’s New-Old Divide” project, co-financed by the Governments of Czechia, Hungary, Poland, and Slovakia through Visegrad Grants from International Visegrad Fund. The mission of the fund is to advance ideas for sustainable regional cooperation in Central Europe.

The project is a collaborative effort of Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and four institutions based in Visegrad countries:

  • Casimir Pulaski Foundation from Poland
  • Institute for Politics and Society from the Czech Republic
  • Comenius University, Faculty of Philosophy, Dept. of Political Science from Slovakia
  • Institute for Foreign Affairs and Trade (IFAT) from Hungary